“Screen Team (Jeanette MacDonald And Nelson Eddy) Of The Month (January 2022)” Featuring Jeanette MacDonald in… The Cat And The Fiddle (1934)

We’re back again for another solo film featuring half of this month’s Screen Team, Jeanette MacDonald! For that, we’ve got her 1934 film The Cat And The Fiddle with Ramon Novarro!

Coming Up Shorts! with… The Loan Stranger (1942)

(available on Blu-ray as part of The Woody Woodpecker Screwball Collection from Universal Studios)

(Length: 6 minutes, 50 seconds)

When Woody’s car breaks down, he gets a loan from a loan shark (or wolf in this case). After thirty days, the wolf comes to collect, but Woody won’t give him the money! This one was back to being fun (after the previous one was a bit of a letdown), as Woody takes on the wolf (and, based on the introduction to the wolf, it’s hard not to cheer for Woody)! The gags are fun, and we also have Woody singing “Everybody Thinks I’m Crazy” again for more hilarity! Kent Rogers does pretty well here voicing both characters (a fact I wouldn’t have known had I not read the IMDb page!), and I know I look forward to seeing this one again and again!

And Now For The Main Feature…

In Brussels, penniless pianist and composer Victor Florescu (Ramon Novarro) makes a deal with a restaurant owner to play some music in exchange for a meal.  When Victor eats more than he agreed to, the restaurant owner tries to charge him for it, but he runs out on the bill.  He makes a successful escape when he hops into a passing cab, which is occupied by Shirley Sheridan (Jeanette MacDonald).  Victor is instantly smitten with her, and, upon arriving at their destination (which, although it is two different apartment buildings, is essentially the same spot since they are next door to each other).  Victor offers to pay the cab fare, but is unable to come up with the money.  The taxi driver (Henry Armetta) decides to take Victor’s portfolio (which contains all his music) as payment (at least, until Victor can actually come up with the money for cab fare).  In his apartment, Victor meets with his music teacher, Professor Bertier (Jean Hersholt), who has good news for him: he has an audition with an arts patron, Jules Daudet (Frank Morgan), who may ask him to write an operetta (that is, if Daudet likes Victor’s music).  Without his portfolio, Victor tries to remember his music, but is interrupted when a neighbor tries to play their own music.  Victor tries to complain through the window, only to discover that the neighbor playing the music is none other than Shirley!  Victor climbs across, and helps her out with some music that she is writing, before remembering his appointment with Daudet that afternoon.  He rushes off to find the taxi driver who has his music portfolio, and, upon finding him, stops traffic while they argue.  A passerby named Charles (Charles Butterworth) loans Victor the money for the portfolio, and Victor rushes off to meet with Daudet.  He is late for the audition, and starts an argument with Daudet before realizing who he is (which almost ends everything right there), but Victor’s declarations of his love for Shirley and how that love is more important than the audition cause Daudet to reconsider.  Daudet is mildly interested in Victor’s music, but while he is playing, Shirley comes to the conservatory looking for Professor Bertier.  She plays her music for him, and Daudet offers to publish her new song.  However, she slaps him when he tries to get fresh with her, and leaves.  Later, Shirley also comes to the realization that she loves Victor, but Daudet tells Victor that, if he is to write the operetta that’s been commissioned, he must do it in Paris.  Much to Daudet’s surprise, Victor declines, preferring to stay with Shirley.  Still, Daudet publishes Shirley’s song, which turns out to be a big hit, and both Shirley and Victor move to Paris.  It doesn’t work out too well for Victor, though, as he struggles to write his operetta in the midst of Shirley’s success, and he plans to return to Brussels.  When Shirley announces her plan to return with him, a jealous Daudet convinces Victor that Shirley would ruin her career if she went back.  Reluctantly, Victor fakes not being in love with her anymore, and returns to Brussels alone. He finishes his operetta, and goes into rehearsal, with the former operetta star Odette Brieux (Vivienne Segal) in the female lead, and her wealthy husband backing the show (at least, until he catches Odette kissing a reluctant Victor and withdraws his backing). Now, Victor is without a leading lady and a leading man, and also facing trouble for writing a bad check. His friend Charles (who is playing the harp for the show) turns to Shirley for help, but she refuses. Will Victor be able to put on his operetta? Will he and Shirley ever get back together?

After filming Love Me Tonight (1932) for Paramount Studios, Jeanette MacDonald took a trip to Europe, and, while there, she signed with MGM. The Cat And The Fiddle, which was based on the hit 1931 Broadway musical of the same name, was her first film under that contract. She was paired up with tenor Ramon Novarro (whose career was already on the downturn at this time), and the film was given a decent-sized budget to work with, part of which went towards filming the finale in the new three-strip Technicolor process (previously used mainly for Walt Disney’s cartoons, since he held exclusive rights for a few years). The movie ended up not doing very well at the box office (resulting in MGM opting not to renew Novarro’s contract the next year), but it did provide a model for the type of movie that would work for Jeanette herself (especially when she was paired up with Nelson Eddy the following year for Naughty Marietta).

In preparation for this month’s Screen Team blogathon, I decided to go with The Cat And The Fiddle for Jeanette MacDonald because it was a new film for me. As has been the usual for the films I’ve seen so far with her in them, I liked it! I thought the story was fun, and I thought the two leads had some good chemistry (nowhere near as much as she had with either Nelson Eddy or Maurice Chevalier, but good enough to help carry the movie). I will admit, I didn’t really find the score by Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach that memorable overall, but the tune “The Night Was Made For Love” stuck with me (helped, obviously, by Jeanette’s beautiful singing voice). The movie did have some good comedic moments, with one of the main standouts being early in the movie, when Novarro’s Victor is running out on his food bill and joins a passing parade, causing the marching band to speed up their beat (and go from walking to running as they played)! Seeing it switch from black-and-white to color for the last five minutes was also interesting (and, leading into it, you could tell that they were about to do something special). Admittedly, it could use a good restoration to improve how it looks, but that can only happen if they actually have the film elements to do so, and I currently have no idea whether they do or not. It may not be Jeanette at her absolute best, but it’s still an entertaining pre-Code that I think is worth recommending!

This movie is available on DVD from Warner Archive Collection.

Film Length: 1 hour, 29 minutes

My Rating: 8/10

List Of Actor/Actress Filmographies/Collections

Love Me Tonight (1932)Jeanette MacDonaldNaughty Marietta (1935)

Fast And Loose (1930) – Frank Morgan – The Good Fairy (1935)

Going Hollywood (1933) – Sterling Holloway – Remember The Night (1940)

As an Amazon Affiliate, this site gets a small percentage for every purchase made upon using one of the Amazon links, even if it’s not the movie I linked to (and it’s at no extra cost to you).  If you like what I’m doing with the blog, please consider using them so that I can continue to do more!

“Screen Team (Jeanette MacDonald And Nelson Eddy) Of The Month (January 2022)” Featuring Jeanette MacDonald in… Monte Carlo (1930)

Now that we’re into the New Year (and the new Screen Team Of The Month blogathon for Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy), we’ll start off with one of Jeanette’s solo outings, the 1930 film Monte Carlo, also starring Jack Buchanan!

Coming Up Shorts! with… Pantry Panic (1941)

(available on Blu-ray as part of The Woody Woodpecker Screwball Collection from Universal Studios)

(Length: 6 minutes, 57 seconds)

Woody Woodpecker ignores the advice of the weather groundhog, and a cold snap hits, leaving him without any food. Then a hungry cat comes a-calling, but finds himself fighting with an equally hungry Woodpecker! Personally, I found this one to be a lot of fun! The way the winter storm comes in and takes away all the food Woody had stored up was fun (and VERY cartoonish), as were the attempts of both Woody and the cat to eat/cook each other. The character was now voiced by Danny Webb, but, in what may be my own inexperience with the character, I didn’t really notice, outside of Woody’s voice being different for one of his last lines (for whatever reason). Regardless, it was still fun (and funny)!

And Now For The Main Feature…

Countess Helene Mara (Jeanette MacDonald) is just about to get married to Duke Otto Von Liebenheim (Claud Allister), but when she finds that her wedding dress doesn’t fit, she uses that excuse to run away. Leaving via train with her maid, Bertha (Zasu Pitts), she decides to go to Monte Carlo, where she hopes to win a fortune by gambling. On her way to the casino, she is seen by Count Rudolph Falliere (Jack Buchanan), who tries to flirt with her, but is ignored. At first, she seems to be winning big at the roulette table, but then she loses everything she had gained. Rudolph is determined to meet the Countess, but he is unable to find an opportunity. Finally, he gets his chance when he runs into and befriends her hairdresser, Paul (John Roche), who helps him out. In his new disguise, Rudolph becomes the Countess’ new hairdresser (although she doesn’t like the name Rudolph and prefers to call him “Paul”). She grows to like him as her hairdresser, and she quickly fires her a few of her other servants when she learns that he can also do their jobs. However, her money quickly runs out, and she has no choice but to fire him, too. Right about that time, the Duke finally finds her, and she reconsiders her engagement to him (which the Duke is fine with, even when she tells him that she would only be marrying him for his money). Wanting to help her out of her predicament, Rudolph tells her that he has been extremely lucky playing roulette, and wants to use his luck to help her out. He takes her out to the casino that night, but they find the Duke there and leave. After they go out dancing and enjoy Monte Carlo together, the Countess returns to her room, and sends Rudolph to the casino to gamble. While she awaits his return (for him, not so much the money), he goes up to his room and grabs some of his own money to give to her as his “winnings.” When he comes back, they kiss, but she asks him to come back the next day. In the morning, Bertha advises her not to become involved with her hairdresser, and she starts to act more standoffish towards Rudolph again when he arrives (which stops him from revealing who he really is). After kissing her, he leaves. Will the two of them get back together, or will she resign herself to being stuck with the Duke, whom she does not love?

With the advent of sound, director Ernst Lubitsch made his first sound film, The Love Parade (1929) as a musical with Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald (in her film debut). With that film’s success (both critically and commercially), Paramount Pictures and the director were ready for more. Due to his new fame in America, Maurice Chevalier was already busy with a few other film projects. Ernst Lubitsch still wanted Jeanette MacDonald for Monte Carlo, even though Paramount’s assistant production head David O. Selznick didn’t think she was a big enough star to carry the film (obviously, the director got his way on this one). With Maurice Chevalier unavailable, they instead cast British musical star Jack Buchanan as the male lead for the film. The Love Parade had differentiated itself from other early talkie musicals by integrating the story and the musical numbers to advance the plot, and the director wanted to continue that trend with Monte Carlo. The movie was successful, particularly for Jeanette MacDonald, as it provided her with what would become her signature tune: “Beyond The Blue Horizon.” It didn’t work out quite so well for Jack Buchanan, who didn’t make any more American films until he appeared in The Band Wagon (1953).

This was a movie that was new to me, which was part of the appeal of watching it for this month’s Screen Team blogathon. I admit, being a film from 1930, I was hesitant, since it seems like a number of the films I’ve seen from that era have struggled with the acting department (due to the then-new sound technology). I’m thrilled to say that the movie proved that idea wrong, and turned out to be a lot more fun than I expected! First off, the acting was superb here. The movie itself was quite funny, especially when making fun of Claud Allister’s Duke (or, for that matter, using the story of Monsieur Beaucaire as an opera to help explain what was going on, since the movie was partly based on that story). And, being a musical, mention must be made of the film’s music, which definitely worked for the characters and the plot. I certainly enjoyed Jeanette MacDonald’s song “Beyond The Blue Horizon,” and how the film made use of the train and its various parts to add to the song. I can easily understand how it became a big hit for her, and I know it’s been stuck in my head after seeing this movie for the first time! I would also say that I enjoyed the songs “Give Me A Moment, Please” and “Always In All Ways” quite a bit, too! The only song that felt dated and quite awkward was “Trimmin’ The Women,” and that does hurt the film just a little bit. So far, I’ve seen two of the four films Jeanette made with Maurice Chevalier, and all eight of her films with Nelson Eddy, so I can say that she doesn’t quite work as well onscreen with Jack Buchanan (although it sounds like she got along with him better off-screen than she did with Maurice Chevalier). That’s not to say that they were terrible together, as I thought they did pretty good. I’m just saying there was a reason she did more films with the other two. Overall, though, this was a very entertaining movie, and one that I am glad I was able to see! Even with its VERY MINOR issues (in my mind), I have no trouble whatsoever in recommending this one!

This movie is available on DVD from Criterion Collection as part of the four-film Eclipse Series 8: Lubitsch Musicals Collection.

Film Length: 1 hour, 30 minutes

My Rating: 10/10

*ranked #3 in Top 10 Movies Watched In 2022

List Of Actor/Actress Filmographies/Collections

Jeanette MacDonaldLove Me Tonight (1932)

Jack Buchanan – The Band Wagon (1953)

As an Amazon Affiliate, this site gets a small percentage for every purchase made upon using one of the Amazon links, even if it’s not the movie I linked to (and it’s at no extra cost to you).  If you like what I’m doing with the blog, please consider using them so that I can continue to do more!

TFTMM’s Screen Team Edition Presents “Screen Team Of The Month (January 2022)” Featuring Jeanette MacDonald And Nelson Eddy

Hey everybody, I’m here to wish you all a Happy New Year! And with the new year, I am resuming my celebrations of various stars and genres for every month. As I announced previously, I will be starting off 2022 with the “Singing Sweethearts” Screen Team of Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy for the month of January!

Table Of Contents

Quick Film Career Bio

Jeanette MacDonald

Birth: June 18, 1903

Death: January 14, 1965

Jeannette Anna McDonald was born in Philadelphia to Daniel McDonald and Anna May in 1903. As a child, she took dancing lessons, but took up singing lessons when she joined her older sister Blossom Rock in New York in 1919. She got roles in the chorus and as second female leads in various shows until 1927, when she landed the lead in Yes, Yes, Yvette. She appeared in several more plays, including Angela, where she was spotted by film star Richard Dix. He got her screen-tested for a movie, but the play’s producers wouldn’t let her out of her contract at the time. Director Ernst Lubitsch saw that screen test later, and cast her in his first sound film, The Love Parade (1929), her first of four pairings with Maurice Chevalier. She signed with Paramount Studios, where she made several more movies (including at least one more for Lubitsch). She tried to produce a film on her own (The Lottery Bride in 1930), but it wasn’t successful. She signed with Fox Film Corporation for three movies, before taking a break from Hollywood for a European concert tour. She came back to Paramount for two more movies with Maurice Chevalier (One Hour With You and Love Me Tonight, both from 1932) before going back to Europe.

While there, she signed with MGM, where she made two films in 1934, The Cat And The Fiddle (which wasn’t much of a success) and The Merry Widow (which was a hit with critics and some audiences, but not enough to make a profit). Then she was paired with newcomer Nelson Eddy for Naughty Marietta (1935), which was much more popular with movie audiences. The following year (1936), they were teamed up again for Rose-Marie while she simultaneously proved her acting chops with a more dramatic role in San Francisco opposite Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy. Wunderkind producer Irving Thalberg made plans to have Jeanette and Nelson do a film version of the Sigmund Romberg operetta Maytime in Technicolor, but his death altered those plans. Instead, a slightly different cast was assembled for the now black-and-white film, and Maytime (1937) became a big hit with audiences. Jeanette and Nelson made two more films in 1938, The Girl Of The Golden West and MGM’s first Technicolor film, Sweethearts. She also had several solo films, including The Firefly (1937) and Broadway Serenade (1939), but neither were as successful as the films with Nelson. After Broadway Serenade, Jeanette left Hollywood for a concert tour. After some negotiations, she came back for three more films with Nelson, Smilin’ Through (1941) with her husband Gene Raymond and Cairo (1942).

With Nelson Eddy buying out his contract after a falling out with MGM head Louis B. Mayer, Jeanette also left the studio after Cairo (along with several other highly paid actresses let go by Mayer). She followed Nelson to Universal, but she only ended up filming two songs for the all-star movie Follow The Boys (1944). That was the last screen appearance she made for several years. She came back to MGM for two final films, Three Daring Daughters (1948) and the Lassie film The Sun Comes Up (1949). In the 1950s, she appeared in various stage productions (though none on Broadway, to the best of my knowledge) and various TV programs. She wanted to make a comeback on the big screen, but most of the attempts (including several with Nelson Eddy) didn’t manage to get off the ground, particularly not helped by a heart condition that had been increasingly plaguing her. In the 1960s, her health went downhill considerably, despite the attempts by doctors to operate on her. Finally, she passed away due to heart failure at the Houston Methodist Hospital on January 14, 1965.

Nelson Eddy

Birth: June 29, 1901

Death: March 6, 1967

In 1901, Nelson Ackerman Eddy was born to Caroline Isabel and William Darius Eddy in Providence, Rhode Island. His family was quite musical, as his mother was a church soloist, his grandmother was an oratorio singer and his father (who deserted his family when Nelson was fourteen) sang in the church choir, played drums, and worked both on- and off-stage. The family had to move around a lot because his father was unable to keep a steady job due partly to his alcoholism, but, after his father left, Nelson had to abandon school and get work (first at an iron works and then later as a newspaper reporter). Singing was still his love, and he started working at the Philadelphia Civic Opera Company in the 1920s. In 1927, Nelson followed his singing teacher to Dresden in Europe to study. When he was offered a job with a German opera company, he turned it down and returned to America, deciding instead to focus on doing concerts (with a handful of opera roles in between).

When he substituted last minute for diva Lotte Lehman at a sold-out concert in L.A. on February 28, 1933, the audience took to him quite well, and he received many offers to go to Hollywood. Figuring that being in the movies would help his concert career, he signed with MGM. At first, they didn’t quite know what to do with him, relegating him to quick appearances with one song each in Broadway To Hollywood (1933), Dancing Lady (1933) and Student Tour (1934). Movie audiences liked him well enough that he was promoted to the male lead opposite Jeanette MacDonald in Naughty Marietta (1935), and a new star (and screen team) was born. While starring alongside Jeanette in seven more films, he also made films opposite other leading ladies at MGM, including Eleanor Powell (Rosalie from 1937), Virginia Bruce (Let Freedom Ring from 1939), Ilona Massey (Balalaika from 1939) and Risë Stevens (The Chocolate Soldier from 1941). Around the time of what turned out to be his final film with Jeanette (I Married An Angel from 1942), Nelson had a falling out with MGM studio head Louis B. Mayer, and bought out his contract. He then signed with Universal Studios for a two-picture deal. His first film there, Phantom Of The Opera (1943), didn’t quite turn out as he had hoped, and he ended things with Universal. He made a few more movies after that, mostly for independent studios, with his final film being Northwest Outpost (1947) for Republic Pictures.

By this time, he was mainly focusing on doing radio shows and making a few television appearances. He had also continued doing concerts, but the rise of television made those less profitable for him. Instead, he adapted by putting together a nightclub act. He still hoped to make some more movies, especially with Jeanette (and even tried to write a few screenplays himself towards that end), but nothing ever came of it, with their only appearances together at that point being on television on various programs. While he was performing at the Sans Souci Hotel in Miami Beach, Florida (in 1967), he suffered a cerebral hemorrhage onstage and later passed away (having been preceded in death by Jeanette nearly two years earlier).

Jeanette MacDonald Filmography

This is a list of all the films that I personally have reviewed from her filmography so far. Obviously, I will be adding to it throughout the month of January, and it is my plan to add to it as I review more and more of her films even beyond this month’s celebration.

Monte Carlo (1930)

Love Me Tonight (1932)

The Cat And The Fiddle (1934)

Naughty Marietta (1935)

Rose-Marie (1936)

San Francisco (1936)

Maytime (1937)

The Girl Of The Golden West (1938)

Nelson Eddy Filmography

This is a list of all the films that I personally have reviewed from his filmography so far. Obviously, I will be adding to it throughout the month of January, and it is my plan to add to it as I review more and more of his films even beyond this month’s celebration.

Dancing Lady (1933)

Naughty Marietta (1935)

Rose-Marie (1936)

Maytime (1937)

The Girl Of The Golden West (1938)

Balalaika (1939)

The Chocolate Soldier (1941)

Phantom Of The Opera (1943)

Make Mine Music (1946)

Entries For This Month

Thoughts From The Music(al) Man –

Monte Carlo (1930)

Make Mine Music (1946)

The Chocolate Soldier (1941)

The Girl Of The Golden West (1938)

The Cat And The Fiddle (1934)

Phantom Of The Opera (1943)

Rules:

Since this blogathon lasts a month, I’ll keep the rules here in case anybody is still interested in joining in:

  1. At this point, I am not putting any restrictions on topics related to the various stars, so you can choose to do one of their films (whether it’s one of their solo movies or one made as a team), or biographies, lists of favorites, etc.
  2. These celebrations are intended as tributes to these stars, so I would ask that any participating posts be respectful of the stars themselves. Obviously, if you don’t care for that specific star, that would probably not be a good month to join in.
  3. I’m requesting that all posts would be new material, and not any previously published ones.
  4. As previously indicated, these celebrations of the stars and genres will last a whole month each, so you will have that whole month to work with. I myself will be publishing about four or five posts per month (depending on the number of Sundays and whether there are any recent disc releases that would fit the bill), so you can decide how many you want to do (within reason).
  5. If you are interested in joining, I would certainly suggest you either comment on this post, email me at astairefan7@gmail.com, or, for the Facebook savvy, contact me at my FB page. And feel free to use the banners I have put together (due to this blogathon focusing on a team instead of one star, I will actually have several to choose from, as opposed to my usual one).

Announcing the Jeanette MacDonald And Nelson Eddy “Screen Team Of The Month (January 2022)” Blogathon

We’re less than a month away from 2022, so that means that it’s time to announce my first “Star Of The Month” blogathon of the year! Of course, as you can tell from the post title, I’m focusing on two stars instead of one (in this instance, the “Singing Sweethearts” team of Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy)! Before I get any further, I would like to mention that I will focus on some other screen teams in 2022, but I will also mostly continue the focus for most months on just one star (with the exception of musical screen teams in September). I will give one hint on which months will focus on screen teams: those with five Sundays (mostly so that I can do two solo films each and one team-up). So be sure to sign up here if you’re interested in doing a film with Jeanette MacDonald and/or Nelson Eddy!

Table Of Contents

My Own Feelings On Jeanette MacDonald And Nelson Eddy

For me, Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy are a pair that I’ve come around to over the last decade. I had seen some of their films before that, like San Francisco (1936) for Jeanette and Dancing Lady (1933) for Nelson (if you get technical, I’d heard him long before that since he voiced the Disney cartoon “Willie, The Operatic Whale” from the 1946 film Make Mine Music, although I mostly just saw the short on VHS as opposed to that entire movie). I had more or less heard of them through the clips used in the That’s Entertainment series, but their operatic style didn’t appeal to me, and their appearances included in the That’s Entertainment films didn’t leave much of an impression on me. Eventually, as I mentioned in my reviews for Rose-Marie (1936) and Naughty Marietta (1935), I worked my way into their films, and I’ve developed a greater appreciation for them, both together and apart. I definitely feel like their popularity has really faded with time, and that’s one reason I wanted to put the focus on them for a month. I know I look forward to seeing some new films for them, revisiting some yet-unreviewed favorites, and hopefully in the process convince others to check them out!

Roster For The Jeanette MacDonald And Nelson Eddy “Star Of The Month (January 2022)” Blogathon

Since this is obviously for next month’s blogathon on Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy, then that’s all you need to worry about signing up for. As always, here are the rules that we are working with.

  1. At this point, I am not putting any restrictions on topics related to the various stars, so you can choose to do one of their films (whether it’s one of their solo movies or one made as a team), or biographies, lists of favorites, etc.
  2. These celebrations are intended as tributes to these stars, so I would ask that any participating posts be respectful of the stars themselves. Obviously, if you don’t care for that specific star (or stars), that would probably not be a good month to join in.
  3. I’m requesting that all posts would be new material, and not any previously published ones.
  4. As previously indicated, these celebrations of the stars and genres will last a whole month each, so you will have that whole month to work with. I myself will be publishing about four or five posts per month (depending on the number of Sundays and whether there are any recent disc releases that would fit the bill), so you can decide how many you want to do (within reason).
  5. If you are interested in joining, I would certainly suggest you either comment on this post, email me at astairefan7@gmail.com, or, for the Facebook savvy, contact me at my FB page. And feel free to use the banners I have put together (due to this blogathon focusing on a team instead of one star, I will actually have several to choose from, as opposed to my usual one).

Thoughts From The Music(al) Man

  • Monte Carlo (1930), The Cat And The Fiddle (1934), The Girl Of The Golden West (1938), The Chocolate Soldier (1941), Phantom Of The Opera (1943) and Make Mine Music (1946)